Articles

Articles by our editors about casual games and the board game industry.

Playing games is not only entertaining, which is in itself a benefit and needed in order to be a “normal” person, they also teach life-skills, contribute to physical well-being, and help the gamer overcome nerves in real-world situations.

5Pax is a set of 10+ casual dice games that recently caught our attention on Kickstarter. We reached out to Dennis Consorte of Galliant Games to learn more about this game line and what players can expect.

Sen-Foong Lim and Jay Cormier are the game design duo behind But Wait, There's More!, an infomercial-style improvisation game now on Kickstarter. In this interview, we find out more about them and some tips for game designers.

Pack O Game is a series of tiny microgames that have raised over $30,000 on Kickstarter. These games appear to be ideal for casual gamers who are looking for portability. We reached out to the designer and publisher, Chris Handy, to learn more about these little gems.

It is clear that the casual video game explosion did not simply happen by accident. What can the board game industry learn from the casual video game industry?

A complete look at the 2014 ASTRA Marketplace & Academy for casual gamers. We have weeded through all of the toys and dolls to find the casual gaming gems — so you don't have to.

Legacy is an upcoming roleplaying/fantasy card game by designer Erick Harding along the lines of Magic: The Gathering. We found the artwork and production quality to be very polished. Upon learning more about the history of the game, we learned some surprising facts, so we set out to hear more from the designer.

Independence is defined, roughly, as being able to do what you want, when you want, the way you want. When it comes to board gaming, this has been an impossibility for the blind and visually impaired communities for far too long. Players are stuck relying on friends and family to make the decisions for them. For the most part, it’s the decision making that makes a game. 64 Oz. Games is working to make games more accessible so blind and visually impaired players can be independent for the first time.

In the tabletop gaming world, traditional standards classify the hierarchy of gamers loosely into "non-gamers," kids/family gamers, and hardcore/hobby gamers. But in reality, there is no such thing as a "non-gamer."

Before jumping into the world of game design, I paused to consider two things. First, I thought about what types of games I would like to design.  My answer was family-friendly games. I defined family-friendly as easy enough for a child to learn, yet with enough meaningful decisions to hold an adult’s attention. I also defined family-friendly as played in an hour or less. That time limit was not just in consideration of the shorter attention span of some children, but also because of typical family schedules. Between school, homework, soccer, dance lessons, etc., even sixty unscheduled minutes for a game can be hard to come by for some families.

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