Game Publishing

Before starting Atheris Games I was not much of a gamer. I knew nothing of the plethora of amazing tabletop gaming products – I had never even heard of Catan or Ticket to Ride. I just simply had an idea for an automotive trading card game, Holeshot Heroes (which has not yet been released). As I began to try to immerse myself in the industry I was taken aback by the depth of products, but I was also incredibly intimidated by the seemingly complex games.

How do games differentiate themselves? How do they stand out? How do you get people to pay attention to your product? Breaking Games has answers.

I consider myself an “accidental inventor.” I’ve been a tinkerer all my life, and lately I had been creating family games, but I never considered myself an inventor. Not until those unforgettable three months in early 2014 when I won BigLeap’s “Games that Make Us Smarter” challenge, and went on to sign a license agreement for a game with FoxMind.

If crowdfunding were a spectator sport, Kickstarter would be the modern-day demolition derby for intellectual property disputes. It has never been easier for game publishers to get themselves into a head-on intellectual property pileup.

Publishing board games brings the risk of possible disputes over intellectual property. New companies often make mistakes — here are the top 3 most common intellectual property mistakes I have seen as an attorney at law.

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